SRF-JRMC kicks off EPDP recruiting drive at MyNavi job employment seminar

By Ryo Isobe, FLEACT Yokosuka Public Affairs

170315-N-JT445-044 YOKOHAMA, Japan (March 15, 2017) – From left to right, Kazuki Ono, Mitsuo Kawamoto and Kentaro Mizuuchi, all production control specialists from Ship Repair Facility and Japan Regional Maintenance Center (SRF-JRMC), answer questions from attendees regarding the command’s Engineering and Planning Development Program at a MyNavi recruitment seminar. SRF-JRMC provides ship maintenance and modernization for Commander, Naval Forces Pacific and U.S. Pacific Fleet using advanced industrial techniques while keeping the U.S. 7th Fleet operationally ready. (U.S. Navy photo by Ryo Isobe, FLEACT Yokosuka Public Affairs, SRF JRMC/Released)

YOKOHAMA, Japan – Ship Repair Facility and Japan Regional Maintenance Center (SRF-JRMC) held an engineer recruitment seminar supported by MyNavi, a job employment agency, for the command’s Engineering and Planning Development Program (EPDP), March 15, 2017.

The command’s engineers supported the event by consulting attendees face-to-face about SRF-JRMC’s training programs and opportunities.

“This program was established in 2015 in order to nurture matured marine engineers,” said Kazuo Akimoto, SRF-JRMC’s training division head. “We have another long-standing program called the apprenticeship program, in which we develop skilled craftsmen. But its counterpart, EPDP, is for up-and-coming engineers.”

In the seminar, the command’s manpower and training personnel, as well as representatives from the engineering and planning department, encouraged attendees to apply. Officials from Japan’s South Kanto Defense and Labor Management Organization for USFJ Employees, Incorporated Administrative Agency (LMO) also joined the event.

Akimoto also pointed out that trainees are employed and fully paid during the program. While they make their living, they can focus on developing themselves as engineers with opportunities such as on-the-job training, English lessons and mentorship from their seniors.

This year the program seeks to accept seven trainees: five planners and two engineers, one specializing in machinery and the other in electric and electronics.

During the event, briefings on the command’s mission, history, jobs, working environment, training and their future position details were delivered. The session also featured video footage introducing SRF-JRMC’s work, shops and codes.

SRF-JRMC’s Master Labor Contractor manpower staff launched this recruitment initiative to coincide with Japan’s job-hunting season for university graduates. Prior to the event, the command carried a notice on MyNavi’s website, featuring EPDP positions to attract participants.

170317-N-JT445-078 YOKOSUKA, Japan (March 17, 2017) – William Porter, an English language instructor from Ship Repair Facility and Japan Regional Maintenance Center (SRF-JRMC), answers a question from a student during an English training class. In this class, the students consist of the command’s apprentices and Engineering and Planning Development Program trainees. They receive about 320 hours of English lessons in the first year. (U.S. Navy photo by Ryo Isobe, FLEACT Yokosuka Public Affairs, SRF JRMC/Released)

By bringing in promising engineers, the command aims to nurture and augment its workforce. Though university degrees are not mandatory, applicants equipped with an engineering knowledge base are favored.

According to Akimoto’s brief, the recruitment and selection process includes English listening comprehension, aptitude tests and interviews.

“Almost all of the attendants that I talked with were interested in English lessons,” said Fumio Iwami, mechanical engineering aid and third-year EPDP trainee. “They also showed interest in the exam and interviews and how to prepare for them.”

SRF-JRMC plans to host another recruiting event in Yokosuka in May 2017.

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