USNH hosts training for SAMFE: Hospital works with community sexual assault investigative teams

By USNH Yokosuka Public Affairs

YOKOSUKA, Japan – Sexual Assault Medical Forensic Examiner (SAMFE) refresher course was held for our hospital and Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Atsugi, Jan. 24.

The Sexual Assault Medical Forensic Examiner (SAMFE) refresher course was held for our hospital and BHC Atsugi.

The intention of the refresher course was not to replace the initial training, but to focus on areas of proficiency and also areas that have changed in the area of responsibility (AOR).

YOKOSUKA, Japan (Jan. 24, 2017) – U.S. Naval Hospital (USNH) Yokosuka's Command Sexual Assault Medical Forensic Examiner (SAMFE) Program Manager,  Lt. Cmdr. Andreas Stiller, right,  instructs Cmdr. Christopher Smith, left,  emergency physician, on proper technique to collect specimens for forensics  investigations during a SAMFE day-long refresher course held at USNH Yokosuka, Jan. 24. Guest lectures were provided by both trial and victim legal counsel, discussing victim advocacy and sexual assault; military criminal investigative officers and the investigative aspects of sexual assault;  legal considerations, and reporting options. The USNH Yokosuka is the largest U.S. military treatment facility on  mainland Japan. The hospital serves a beneficiary population of approximately 43, 000 active duty personnel, family members, civilian employees, contract personnel and retirees.  (U.S. Navy photo by USNH Yokosuka Public Affairs/Released by USNH PAO)

YOKOSUKA, Japan (Jan. 24, 2017) – U.S. Naval Hospital (USNH) Yokosuka’s Command Sexual Assault Medical Forensic Examiner (SAMFE) Program Manager, Lt. Cmdr. Andreas Stiller, right, instructs Cmdr. Christopher Smith, left, emergency physician, on proper technique to collect specimens for forensics investigations during a SAMFE day-long refresher course held at USNH Yokosuka, Jan. 24.
Guest lectures were provided by both trial and victim legal counsel, discussing victim advocacy and sexual assault; military criminal investigative officers and the investigative aspects of sexual assault; legal considerations, and reporting options.
The USNH Yokosuka is the largest U.S. military treatment facility on mainland Japan. The hospital serves a beneficiary population of approximately 43, 000 active duty personnel, family members, civilian employees, contract personnel and retirees. (U.S. Navy photo by USNH Yokosuka Public Affairs/Released by USNH PAO)

“Performing medical forensic exams is not the main role of our duties,” said Lt. Cmdr. Andreas Stiller, USNH Yokosuka’s Command SAMFE Program Manager. “Providing compassionate patient-centered care and augment the command’s response ability in preventing and eliminating sexual assault is also important.”

Guest lectures were provided by both trial and victim legal counsel, discussing victim advocacy and sexual assault; military criminal investigative officers and the investigative aspects of sexual assault; legal considerations, and reporting options.

Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) was also present for two lectures, discussing forensic evidence processing and analysis for sexual assault cases.

Fleet Activities (FLEACT) Yokosuka’s Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, Yoko Clingensmith presented her role in the victims care and how her services are important in the SAMFE’s role.

“Victim advocates fall under her management,” said Stiller. “These professionals provide assistance to the victim during their contact with medical providers, SAMFE, NCIS, legal counsel and possible trial.”

During the course, several mock exams were performed, practicing on how to collect and document evidence, correctly store the evidence, and transfer the evidence with proper chain of custody, depending on restricted or unrestricted reporting.

Discussion of sexually transmitted diseases evaluation and treatment, pregnancy risk evaluation and care, discharge planning, as well as follow-up care were also covered.

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