SRF-JRMC kicks off series of multi-cultural training at Sasebo detachment

By Ryo Isobe, FLEACT Yokosuka Public Affairs

161020-N-JT445-264 SASEBO, Japan (Oct. 20, 2016) – John Page, a training co-facilitator and member of the corporate communications branch, conducts an initial thought exercise for the command’s multi-cultural training to Japanese and U.S. military and civilian supervisors at Ship Repair Facility and Japan Regional Maintenance Center (SRF-JRMC) Sasebo detachment. The exercise presented situations that, according to Page, are relevant to employees and likely to experience in SRF-JRMC’s command culture.  SRF-JRMC provides ship maintenance and modernization for Commander, Naval Forces Pacific and U.S. Pacific Fleet using advanced industrial techniques while keeping the U.S. 7th Fleet operationally ready.  (U.S. Navy photo by Ryo Isobe, FLEACT Yokosuka Public Affairs, SRF JRMC/Released)

161020-N-JT445-264 SASEBO, Japan (Oct. 20, 2016) – John Page, a training co-facilitator and member of the corporate communications branch, conducts an initial thought exercise for the command’s multi-cultural training to Japanese and U.S. military and civilian supervisors at Ship Repair Facility and Japan Regional Maintenance Center (SRF-JRMC) Sasebo detachment. The exercise presented situations that, according to Page, are relevant to employees and likely to experience in SRF-JRMC’s command culture. SRF-JRMC provides ship maintenance and modernization for Commander, Naval Forces Pacific and U.S. Pacific Fleet using advanced industrial techniques while keeping the U.S. 7th Fleet operationally ready. (U.S. Navy photo by Ryo Isobe, FLEACT Yokosuka Public Affairs, SRF JRMC/Released)

SASEBO, Japan (Oct. 20, 2016) - Ship Repair Facility and Japan Regional Maintenance Center (SRF-JRMC) Yokosuka corporate communications team visited the command’s Sasebo detachment to conduct multi-cultural training. The training was given to Japanese, U.S. military and civilian supervisors.

Inspired by employees’ requests, the training was established to encourage understanding and respect for cultural diversity, provide suggestions on how to manage differences and increase productivity.

“I think the training was very good, because it was mainly focused on educating the U.S. [personnel] on the Japanese culture,” said Cmdr. Daniel Kidd, the Sasebo Det. Officer in Charge.  “And I would like to have more of the pieces on how we educate Japanese employees on American culture.”

The sessions elaborated on cultural differences, how they arise and how to cope with the differences.  For example, presentation scenarios highlighted where Japanese are inclined to be group-centric thinkers; Americans, individualistic.

The training facilitators said they were aware of the risks of over-generalization when developing the training.  But they said it was still important to provide a learning opportunity to the workforce.

Alicia Akashi, a supervisory command hotline coordinator who spearheaded the training, explained that this training would provide an internal venue to observe and discuss possible outcomes on work performance in cases where such differences are misunderstood.

161020-N-JT445-260 SASEBO, Japan (Oct. 20, 2016) – Ship Repair Facility and Japan Regional Maintenance Center (SRF-JRMC) Sasebo detachment Todd Jack, business and strategic planning officer (front center); Cmdr. Daniel Kidd (back center), officer in charge; and Cmdr. Clinton Lawler, production and waterfront operations officer (back right), listen to a multi-cultural training facilitated by the command’s corporation communications team.  (U.S. Navy photo by Ryo Isobe, FLEACT Yokosuka Public Affairs, SRF JRMC/Released)

161020-N-JT445-260 SASEBO, Japan (Oct. 20, 2016) – Ship Repair Facility and Japan Regional Maintenance Center (SRF-JRMC) Sasebo detachment Todd Jack, business and strategic planning officer (front center); Cmdr. Daniel Kidd (back center), officer in charge; and Cmdr. Clinton Lawler, production and waterfront operations officer (back right), listen to a multi-cultural training facilitated by the command’s corporation communications team. (U.S. Navy photo by Ryo Isobe, FLEACT Yokosuka Public Affairs, SRF JRMC/Released)

“Depending upon the perceptions or perspectives of individuals, it may differ,” said Akashi.  “However, we think we should be aware of the differences and make ourselves[a] more productive team.”

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