Ronald Reagan Advances 192 Sailors

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cody Hendrix,
USS Ronald Reagan Public Affairs

YOKOSUKA, Japan – Smiles are bright and eyes are glistening as Sailors stand in line for the chance to shake hands with leadership and take on duties of the next rank.

The U.S. Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) advanced 192 Sailors to the next pay grade during a frocking ceremony, June 2.

160602-N-IN729-667 YOKOSUKA, Japan (June 2, 2016) Capt. Buzz Donnelly, the commanding officer of the Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), addresses Sailors and guests during a frocking ceremony in the ship’s hangar bay. Ronald Reagan provides a combat-ready force which protects and defends the collective maritime interests of the U.S. and its allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ryan McFarlane/Released)

160602-N-IN729-667 YOKOSUKA, Japan (June 2, 2016) Capt. Buzz Donnelly, the commanding officer of the Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), addresses Sailors and guests during a frocking ceremony in the ship’s hangar bay. Ronald Reagan provides a combat-ready force which protects and defends the collective maritime interests of the U.S. and its allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ryan McFarlane/Released)

Ronald Reagan’s commanding officer Capt. Buzz Donnelly personally congratulated these Sailors and presented their frocking letters.

“192 Sailors – that is exceptional,” said Donnelly. “It didn’t happen by accident. There’s a lot of hard work and perseverance that goes into maintaining a clear objective and making sure you accomplish it.”

Frocked Sailors have the right to wear the uniform and assume the responsibilities of the next pay grade.

“Listen to your chiefs, seek out answers for yourself and study as you do your job daily,” said Personnel Specialist 1st Class David Phaxayseng, from Shoreline, Washington. Phaxayseng eanred first class petty officer in four years of Naval service. “These all helped me get to where I am today.”

Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Christian Flores, from Los Angeles, attributed his recent success to hard work and patience during a year-and-a-half of service.

“I came into the Navy as an E-1, so finally making petty officer is an amazing feeling,” said Flores.

160602-N-IN729-552 YOKOSUKA, Japan (June 1, 2016) Machinist’s Mate 3rd Class Robert Ferkey, from Nekoosa, Wisconsin, stands in formation as he waits to be promoted to the rank of petty officer second class during a frocking ceremony in the hangar bay of the Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). Ronald Reagan provides a combat-ready force which protects and defends the collective maritime interests of the U.S. and its allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ryan McFarlane/Released)

160602-N-IN729-552 YOKOSUKA, Japan (June 1, 2016) Machinist’s Mate 3rd Class Robert Ferkey, from Nekoosa, Wisconsin, stands in formation as he waits to be promoted to the rank of petty officer second class during a frocking ceremony in the hangar bay of the Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ryan McFarlane/Released)

Frocking is a term for a commissioned or non-commissioned officer selected for promotion wearing the insignia of the higher grade before the official date of promotion. The Navy has used the term “frocking” throughout its history, but it was not officially referred to in advancement policies until 1974 in the Bureau of Naval Personnel Manual.

The Navy provides advancement exams twice a year for those who wish to add chevrons next cycle.

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