225 GW Sailors Add Chevrons During Frocking Ceremony

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Paolo Bayas

Newly-promoted petty officers stand in formation during a frocking ceremony in the hangar bay of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3nd Class Chris Cavagnaro

Newly-promoted petty officers stand in formation during a frocking ceremony in the hangar bay of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73).
U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3nd Class Chris Cavagnaro

PHILIPPINE SEA – The U.S. Navy’s forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) frocked 225 Sailors to the next pay grade during a frocking ceremony in the ship’s hangar bay, May 26.

Twenty-five second class and 84 third class petty officers earned an additional chevron while 116 Sailors earned their very first perched eagle and chevron.

Frocking ceremonies allow Sailors to assume the title and wear the uniform of the next rank before the entitlement of increased pay or other monetary allowances. The appointment carries with it the obligation that each frocked Sailor exercise increased authority and willingly accept greater responsibility.

“It’s especially rewarding considering our forward deployed operational tempo and how hard they work every single day,” said Capt. Timothy Kuehhas, George Washington’s commanding officer. “It was quite an honor to shake each one of their hands.”

Sailors were individually congratulated by Kuehhas, Capt. Kenneth Strong, George Washington’s executive officer, and George Washington’s Command Master Chief, Jason Haka.

Capt. Timothy Kuehhas, commanding officer of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73), center-left, congratulates newly-promoted petty officers during a frocking ceremony in the ship's hangar bay. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3nd Class Chris Cavagnaro

Capt. Timothy Kuehhas, commanding officer of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73), center-left, congratulates newly-promoted petty officers during a frocking ceremony in the ship’s hangar bay.
U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3nd Class Chris Cavagnaro

“It’s great to see that our Sailors can use the knowledge they execute daily and apply that to an advancement exam and succeed,” said Haka. “This is a part of a new chapter in their lives where they spent the last few moments in their previous pay grades walking up a stage, shaking our captain’s hand and getting frocked. I look forward to seeing all of the new leaders out there on the deck plates.”

The very first rating badge insignias were first prescribed in 1833 as an eagle and anchor. The eagle on the petty officer rating badge is derived from the Napoleonic eagle, but in 1941, the Navy changed the eagle’s facing direction to follow heraldic rules, which faces right toward the wearers “sword arm”. This rule continues to apply, and the eagle now faces to the front or the wearer’s right.

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