Lassen Enhances Cooperation with JMSDF

By Lt. j.g. Lauren Chatmas, USS Lassen Public Affairs

 Arleigh-burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Lassen (DDG 82) (right) conducts surfarce warfare operations with Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force's JS Kurama (DDH 144). U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g. Lauren Chatmas

Arleigh-burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Lassen (DDG 82) (right) conducts surfarce warfare operations with Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force’s JS Kurama (DDH 144).
U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g. Lauren Chatmas

EAST CHINA SEA – The Arleigh-burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Lassen (DDG 82) conducted bilateral operations with two Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) destroyers in support of region surface warfare operations, Feb. 11 and 13.

Lassen executed helicopter cross-deck operations, surface warfare tactics, flag hoist drills, communication drills, and personnel exchanges with JS Hamagiri (DD155) and JS Kurama (DDH 144), respectively.

“We always look forward to bilateral integration with the Japanese because they have very capable ships and the professionalism of their crew is second to none,” said Cmdr. Michael A. Smith, commander officer of Lassen.  “Allied partnership and collaboration of forces is essential to mission accomplishment in this region.”

The planned events enabled ships from both nations to work together and execute tactical exercises in partnership with allied countries.

An MH-60R of the 'Warlords' of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 51 from Arleigh-burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Lassen (DDG 82) lands on board Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force's JS Hamagiri (DD 155). U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Patrick O'Neill

An MH-60R of the ‘Warlords’ of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 51 from Arleigh-burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Lassen (DDG 82) lands on board Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force’s JS Hamagiri (DD 155).
U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Patrick O’Neill

Personnel from both ships were able to experience the operations of the allied ship.  From lunch in the wardroom to spending time on the bridge, Lassen crew members were able to understand how their counterparts act towards a common mission.

“The hospitality of Kurama’s crew was exceptionally generous,” said Ensign Barry Feinstein. “The ship’s upkeep was immaculate, and their ship handling skills were flawless.”

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